Tag Archives: content writing

Social Media Engagement – How Much Time is Needed?

There are differing opinions about how often you should post on social media sires like Facebook, Google Plus, and LinkedIn when you want to promote your business. Advice can range from once a week to multiple times a day. What’s the right amount? What about personal profile posts?

Posting on Social Media Business Pages

Based upon various studies and articles on the subject, Twitter seems to be the platform that requires the most engagement, with multiple tweets daily being suggested. Regardless of how often you believe you need to be posting to your business pages, even if it’s just once a week, one thing that’s agreed upon is that your posts need to be informative and add value. Even if you’re spinning an article or curating existing content, rather than writing totally original content, this takes more time that just posting a link to another page. Your comment on the post often needs to be formatted and have hash tags. The are tools like Buffer and Hootsuite, but you’ll still to come up with content, add imagery, which needs to be optimized with an alt tag and description, etc. I’m not even factoring in the time it takes to create original images, slides, and video. How do you find the time?

Just like anything else that needs to get done, you need to make time for your priorities. There’s only so much time in the day, and sometimes proper time management calls for delegation. A top executive may need to devote more time on other business matters and find it cost-efficient to delegate social media engagement to others. That’s not a problem, but what about the small business owner without the funds to hire social media help?

Social media content writing requires proper time management, discipline, and organizational skills. I find it best to schedule my blogging on a certain day of the week. Occasionally I don’t always meet this goal because I’m putting work for others ahead of my own, but I do my best to make the time and stick to the schedule. When I can, I write an extra article to have in reserve for the weeks when I’m really crunched for time.

Posting on Social Media Personal Profile Pages

I spend all day in front of my computer, and much of it working on social media tasks. I don’t really have any time left over these days to post on my personal pages. I make time to stay in touch on Facebook with one of my long-distance friends who’s ill, that’s about it. While I’m on there, I’ll spend a few minutes reading my timeline and may comment on some posts, but I notice some of my friends are avid users and post regularly. I have to wonder where they find the time. Many have jobs and a social life. It’s true that these types of posts don’t require lots of effort, compared to writing an article or blog post. However, there are some people that post constantly enough that it’s equivalent to writing a novel, plus they leave numerous lengthy comments on others’ posts. That’s when I begin to wonder if they have a life in the real world, have social media addiction, or are just needy for attention.

Are you finding it a breeze to manage your business’ social media? Do you have time-management tricks to share? Do you think there should be a limit to how much time one spends on social media for personal pages? Please share any advice or thoughts…if you can find the time.

Copywriting Tips to Drive Traffic and Sales

Copywrting tips

A copywriter must to use the most effective strategies to get viewers to click and continue reading. With so many sites competing for the limited attention of online viewers, you need a way to grab a reader’s attention and avoid having them click away before reading your message. Some essential copywriting guidelines to follow are listed below.

Copywriting that Gets Results

  • Write an effective headline. – The headline is key for grabbing a viewer’s attention. It needs to be compelling and intriguing, your viewers need to want to click and find out more. Spend time putting thought into your headline. This is the most important part of your copywriting. If your headline doesn’t motivate the viewer to click on the link and read on, the rest of what you say won’t really matter.
  • Use visual, rich media and alternative content display to grab users’ attention. – Using videos has been shown to be an effective communication tool, but images and graphs are also useful. The key is to present information in a novel, unexpected, and visually appealing way. Be careful not to use media that takes too long to load on the page. Studies have shown that even one second can make the difference between a viewer clicking away from the page or not. It’s been estimated that a third of viewers will abandon the page between one and five seconds if it has a slow load time.
  • Be informative. – Your content should offer something of value to the reader. With so many sites begging for online attention, your content needs to reward your viewers’ attention with something of benefit to them.
  • Be relatable. – This goes beyond just writing in a way that’s easy to read. While it’s important to use the right tone in speaking to the audience you’re targeting, you also want to make it easy for them to identify with what you’re saying. The use of personal narrative is an effective way of allowing the audience connect with your message.
  • Use keywords effectively. – Don’t overstuff your content with keywords. Use them in a logical way that flows naturally with the delivery of the information being presented.

Online consumers are bombarded with messages trying to grab their attention. You need to keep their limited attention span in mind. Getting viewers to click is the initial hurdle. After that, your words are the magic glue that keeps them from bouncing off of the page. With properly crafted content, your words will convert your viewers into customers.

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Freelancing for Friends – Do Work and Friends Mix?

Freelance writing work for friends

Have you ever worked for a friend? Are you still friends?

Written Contracts – Are They Always Necessary?

A fellow blogger and close friend recently asked me to do a small freelance job and I accepted her offer via email. I helped her out for free when I was steadily employed, but told her I can no longer work for free now that I’m getting my freelance copywriter business off the ground. I’ve thought of this friend as a sister for several decades, due to the history we shared in our youth. I didn’t think it would be necessary to sign a formal work agreement, especially for only fifty dollars.

I thought about how many times I’d told others to always have a contract signed. Suddenly, I felt like a big hypocrite. I imagined what would happen if my dear friend decided to stiff me. While content writing isn’t making me rich at the moment, I’d be upset about more than money. Failure to get paid would be more upsetting because of the statement it made about our friendship. It’s frustrating to waste my valuable time and efforts, but I would be deeply hurt and demoralized to be used by a friend that way. Many others out in the business world- government agencies, corporate entities, etc. already mistreat me, I sort of expect it from others now. However, I still cling to the belief that I can count on my friends to value and respect me. It would really throw me for a loop to be taken advantage of by someone I considered a best friend. I’d hate to think she valued saving fifty dollars more than she valued our friendship or me. While I don’t value myself according to how others do, but it would still sting.

Drawing Boundaries in Business

I decided rather than risk losing a good friend or my faith in humanity, I should just refuse to work for a friend again. If someone offers me a job, I will accept only if the money is more important to me than the friendship. That’s just how it’s going to have to be now. I’ve learned over the years I must set healthy boundaries. Pain has been a motivating factor in setting up boundaries, I’ve established more than a surveyor’s map by now. I prefer to erect boundaries before, rather than after the suffering, but don’t want to become isolated inside too many barricades either. If you’ve been burned by a friend and have since set the same boundary, please share. If you think I’m going overboard, I’d like to hear from you too.

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